NEW

 

The 14-Day Plank Plan | MyFitnessPal

You already know the plank is a great core exercise. So we’re adding variations to amp up your training, target your midsection from different angles to test your muscles (and your mind).Welcome to the 14-Day Plank Plan that will help you get a super...

Survival Uses For Peppermint Oil

Peppermint oil is one of the most used essential oils in the United States, so check out its survival benefits here! In this article: Peppermint Oil Uses and Health BenefitsBoosts Energy LevelRelieves HeadacheJoint PainsRepels InsectsAllows Easy BreathingIrritable...

21-Day Walking Plan That Will Help You Lose Weight

  In a day and age where most of us remain sedentary and inactive, simply by moving more and going for walks as opposed to an elevator or escalator can drastically increase one’s metabolism and burn many more calories. While most people in the Western world try...

Walking is the best exercise to lose weight, control diabetes, say experts

Not the type to lift weights in the gym? No patience for yoga? Feel like you’ll pass out 5 seconds into running? We hear you. Walking is the best form of exercise you can take up. It’s great for people who are trying to lose weight, the elderly, diabetic or those who...

5 Reasons Why Water Is Good for Weight Loss

Water is an essential nutrient that makes your body run smoothly and efficiently. Because the average adult’s body is about 65% water, it’s no wonder that we can only survive for about three to five days without it! Water transports nutrients and oxygen to cells,...

The most surprising foods Weight Watchers considers zero points — and why

mimagephotography/Shutterstock   Weight Watchers has long assigned a point system to foods for dieters. The idea is to encourage people to stay away from less healthy foods, like a slice of cake, by making those items account for more of a person's daily...

Being outside can improve memory, fight depression, and lower blood pressure — here are 12 science-backed reasons to spend more time outdoors

Shutterstock   Spending time in forests, hiking in mountains, and just being outside can lead to significant health benefits. Studies have shown that walking in the woods can improve blood pressure, boost mental health, and decrease cancer risk. So go spend some...

Gain Muscle Mass Using Only Dumbbells With 10 Demonstrated Exercises | Strong Muscle

Gain Muscle Mass Using Only Dumbbells With 10 Demonstrated Exercises   Dumbbells are an inexpensive and versatile. They allow you to create many workouts that build muscle mass and also define muscle appearance. Weight, reps and pace are the biggest attribute to...

‘I’m A Certified Trainer And I Think Burpees Are Idiotic’

The burpee is an inherently bad exercise. However you do it—chest to the ground, with a pushup, holding a plank—the bottom line is, throwing yourself to the ground and immediately getting back up again is a really stupid idea. Throwing yourself on the ground...

A Guide on How to Choose Healthy Protein Bar

  In your diet, one of the essential components is protein. Are you trying to lose weight or address other health conditions? Well, eating protein will assist you to reach your goals easily. However, it is quite difficult to choose the best healthy protein bars...

Being outside can improve memory, fight depression, and lower blood pressure — here are 12 science-backed reasons to spend more time outdoors

hawaii woman hiking cliffShutterstock

 

Spending time in forests, hiking in mountains, and just being outside can lead to significant health benefits. Studies have shown that walking in the woods can improve blood pressure, boost mental health, and decrease cancer risk. So go spend some time “forest-bathing” to improve your health.

Many people spend workdays indoors under fluorescent lights and in front of computers, then return home to bask in the glow of television screens.

But research suggests it’s important to make time to get outdoors as well, since doing so is beneficial — maybe essential — for human health. Psychologists and health researchers are finding more and more science-backed reasons we should go outside and enjoy the natural world.

In her book, “The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative,” journalist Florence Williams writes that she started investigating the health benefits of nature after moving from the mountainous terrain of Boulder, Colorado, to what she describes as “the anti-Arcadia that is the nation’s capital”: Washington, DC.

“I felt disoriented, overwhelmed, depressed,” she wrote. “My mind had trouble focusing. I couldn’t finish thoughts. I couldn’t make decisions and I wasn’t keen to get out of bed.”

We don’t all need to move to beautiful places like Boulder — there are good reasons for many of us to live in bigger cities. 

But humans do need to spend time in natural environments if they want to improve their physical and mental health. That could mean taking advantage of hiking trails near your home, playing in the snow, swimming in the ocean, or just spending time every week in a local park.

Here are 12 reasons why it’s so important.

Walking in nature could improve your short-term memory. Flickr / Carlos Andrés Reyes

Several studies show that nature walks have memory-promoting effects that other walks don’t.

In one study, University of Michigan students were given a brief memory test, then divided into two groups. One group took a walk around an arboretum, and the other took a walk down a city street. When the participants returned and did the test again, those who had walked among trees did almost 20% percent better than they had first time. The people who had taken in city sights instead did not consistently improve.

similar study on depressed individuals found that walks in nature boosted working memory much more than walks in urban environments.

Being outdoors has a demonstrated de-stressing effect. Shutterstock/solarsven

Something about being outside changes the physical expression of stress in the body.

One study found that students sent into the forest for two nights had lower levels of cortisol — a hormone often used as a marker for stress — than those who spent that time in a city.

In another study, researchers found a decrease in both the heart rates and levels of cortisol of participants who spent time in the forest compared to those in the city.

“Stressful states can be relieved by forest therapy,” the researchers concluded. 

Among office workers, even a view of nature out a window is associated with lower stress and higher job satisfaction.

Spending time outside reduces inflammation. Aidan Jones/flickr

When inflammation goes into overdrive, it’s associated with a wide range of ills, including autoimmune disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, depression, and cancer. Spending time in nature may be one way to help keep that in check.

In one study, students who spent time in the forest had lower levels of inflammation than those who spent time in the city. In another, elderly patients who had been sent on a weeklong trip into the forest showed reduced signs of inflammation. There were some indications that the woodsy jaunt had a positive effect on those patients’ hypertension levels as well.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

 

Read more: feedproxy.google.com

Previous

Next